Travel Week in Review – February 12, 2021

Travel Week in Review – February 12, 2021

With the seventh most powerful passport in the world, Americans are used to the privilege of access to almost any country on demand. Before the pandemic, Americans could travel to 185 of the world’s 195 countries visa-free, or with a visa on arrival. But due to the high coronavirus rates in the U.S., dozens of destinations (including the European Union) have deemed the U.S. ‘high risk’ and closed their doors to Americans. So what countries can Americans visit right now? Read More…

Now that the U.S. requires visitors and returning residents to provide proof of negative COVID-19 test results in order to enter the country, international travel has become more complicated and uncertain. Not only does this dictate that leaving the country will require that you locate approved testing sites at your destination, but it also means you’ll need to be prepared for an extended stay. Read More…

Delta Air Lines will be keeping its middle seat off-limits until April 30, 2021. “We want our customers to have complete confidence when traveling with Delta, and they continue to tell us that more space provides more peace of mind,” Bill Lentsch, Delta’s Chief Customer Experience Officer said. Delta has continued to provide customers with peace of mind by providing an at-home testing option and also launching an interactive map to help answer all questions when it comes to traveling amid the pandemic. Read More…

Throughout history, pandemics have prompted civic responses that have made cities better in the long run. New York’s Central Park, for instance, was partly a health care initiative, conceived in response to the cholera outbreaks that had swept through the city. While we still don’t know how COVID-19 will play out, its impact on cities is coming into focus, with consequences that once again could turn out to be unexpectedly positive. Read More…

Just before Germany entered its second partial pandemic lockdown on November 2, travel enthusiasts had a big opening to celebrate on October 31: the long-awaited Berlin Brandenburg “Willy Brandt” Airport, which debuted after nearly a decade of delays and a final price tag billions over budget. The biggest takeaway for airport officials, aviation enthusiasts, and many Germans was simply that the long-awaited airport, whose code is BER, is finally opening its doors after many years of setbacks. Read More…


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